Saab Technology

How it Works: Saab ESP

Electronic stability program (ESP)   also referred to as Electronic stability control (ESC), or dynamic stability control (DSC), is a computerized technology  that improves the safety of a vehicle’s stability by detecting and reducing loss of traction (skidding). 

The video is in Swedish, but basically the first part is with the ESP off and the next is with it on.

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When ESC detects loss of steering control, it automatically applies the brakes to help “steer” the vehicle where the driver intends to go. Braking is automatically applied to wheels individually, such as the outer front wheel to counter oversteer or the inner rear wheel to counter understeer. Some ESC systems also reduce engine power until control is regained. 

9-5-esp

Modern  ABS system from SAAB incorporates electronic brake-force distribution (EBD – electronic brakeforce distribution) and an electronic traction-control system (TCS). The new ESP system works with TCS, which requires a modified ABS system tuned to the parameters of ESP.

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ABS+EBD+TCS +ESP – Saab’s ESP system uses all these inputs to calculate the car’s behavior. But it also has the advantage of the extra yaw and steering wheel sensors, allowing smoother TCS and ESP control because the engine-management system is given more information to “understand” the car’s behavior and then react accordingly.

This videos demonstrating the benefits of Saab’s Electronic Stability Program (ESP):

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Effectiveness of the SAAB ESP, skip to 2:09 when ESP is turned Off:

New Saab 9-5 ESC Test: The test is a sine with dwell manoeuvre at 50mph and comprises a sinusoidal steer in one direction, followed by a steer in the opposite direction, with a dwell of 500 milliseconds at the second peak. It is controlled by a steering robot to give a precise and repeatable steering input, and the runs build up to a steering wheel angle of 270 degrees:

Goran Aničić
the authorGoran Aničić
For over 10 years, Goran Aničić has been passionately focused on Saab automobiles and everything related to them. His initial encounter with Saab cars took place back in 2003 when the first Saab 9-3 and sedan version were introduced. At that moment, he was captivated by the car's Scandinavian design logic and top-notch engineering, and everything that followed stemmed from that first encounter. Later on, through his work at the editorial team of the Serbian automotive magazines "Autostart" and later "AutoBild," he had the opportunity to engage more closely with Saab vehicles. In 2008, he tested the latest Saab cars of that time, such as the Saab 9-3 TTiD Aero and Saab 9-3 Turbo X. In 2010, as the sole blogger from the region, he participated in the Saab 9-5ng presentation in Trollhättan, Sweden. Alongside journalists from around the world, he got a firsthand experience of the pinnacle of technological offerings from Saab at that time. Currently, Goran owns two Saabs: a 2008 Saab 9-3 Vector Sportcombi with a manual transmission, and a Saab 9-3 Aero Griffin Sport Sedan from the last generation, which rolled off the production line in Trollhättan in December 2011.

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